Krishnamurti and Nitya

1895 - 1899
1895

J. Krishnamurti born in May 11 Madanapalle, Andhra Pradesh, India

Lumiere Bros.
1st Paris screening of moving pictures

Gillette invents safety razor

Marconi invents wireless radio

Oscar Wilde sent to Reading Gaol

Wurzberg:
Prof. Roentgen discovers X-rays

Frederick Douglass,
abolitionist, reformer, dies

Karl Marx – Das Kapital
posthumous publication

Art Nouveau style in vogue

Sigmund Freud:
Studien uber Hysterie

Louis Pasteur dies

Adyar
1896

Beginning of
Klondike Gold Rush

Richard Strauss composes
Thus Spake Zarathustra

Puccini: La Boheme

Modern Olympic Games
inaugurated by Coubertin in Paris

Gold discovered in South Africa

1897

Besant tours America, founds 23 new branches of Theosophical Society

War between
Greece and Ottoman Empire

George Melies opens studio for moving pictures

Bram Stoker writes Dracula

Germany occupies
Kiao-chow, China

Russia occupies Port Arthur

Italy defeated by Abyssinians

Dr. Annie Besant’s visit to Cardiff, Wales, 1924

CLICK TO EXPAND
1898

J. Nityananda born, brother of Krishnamurti

Besant founds Central Hindu College

USA seizes Guam from Spain

Battleship Maine blown up
in Havana harbor

Spanish-American War begins

USA occupies Cuba

Emile Zola writes J’accuse in response to the Dreyfuss Case
Pierre and Marie Curie
discover radium

Lewis Carroll, author of
Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, dies

Photographs taken
using artificial light

1899

Philippines proclaim
independent government:
conflict with USA

Scott Joplin: “King of Ragtime”
writes Maple Leaf Rag

Leo Tolstoi writes
Resurrection

1st Peace Conference at
the Hague

The Challenge of Change film documents Krishnamurti’s life from the early theosophical days to his mid-80’s when he was still traveling, giving talks and holding dialogues.

In May of 1895 in a cramped house in Madanapalle, in the south of India, a child was born. The eighth child of an orthodox Telegu speaking Brahmin family, his mother Sanjeevama, and father Narayaniah named him Krishnamurti (the image or likeness of Krishna) after the Hindu god, Shri Krishna, who was considered the eighth incarnation of the god Vishnu.

Photo: Wisler & Klein, Madras
C.W. Leadbeater

Krishnamurti’s brother Nityananda was born. He was to become very close to him. That same year the frail and sickly Krishnamurti contracted malaria and barely survived.

Photo: Ruspoli, 1910
Dr. Annie Besant
Early Theosophical gathering

Mr. Warrington, the acting President of the Theosophical Society, kindly invited me to come to Adyar and to give some talks here. I am very glad to have accepted his invitation and I appreciate his friendliness, which I hope will continue, even though we may differ completely in our ideas and opinions.

I hope that you will all listen to my talks without prejudice, and will not think that I am trying to attack your society. I want to do quite another thing. I want to arouse the desire for true search, and this, I think, is all that a teacher can do. That is all I want to do. If I can awaken that desire in you, I have completed my task, for out of that desire comes intelligence, that intelligence which is free from any system and organized belief. This intelligence is beyond all thought of compromise and false adjustment. So during these talks, those of you who belong to various societies or groups will please bear in mind that I am very grateful to the Theosophical Society and its acting President for having asked me to come here to speak, and that I am not attacking the Theosophical Society. I am not interested in attacking. But I hold that while organizations for the social welfare of man are necessary, societies based on religious hopes and beliefs are pernicious. So though I may appear to speak harshly, please bear in mind that I am not attacking any particular society, but that I am against all these false organizations which, though they profess to help man, are in reality a great hindrance and are the means of constant exploitation.

Krishnamurti – Public Talk 1, Adyar, 29 December 1933

“At the moment of light, thought withers away, and the conscious effort to experience and the remembrance of it, is the world that has been. And the word is never the actual.

At that moment -which is not of time- the ultimate is the immediate, but the ultimate has no symbol, it is of no person, of no god.”

1895

J. Krishnamurti born in May 11 Madanapalle, Andhra Pradesh, India

Lumiere Bros.
1st Paris screening of moving pictures

Gillette invents safety razor

Marconi invents wireless radio

Oscar Wilde sent to Reading Gaol

Wurzberg:
Prof. Roentgen discovers X-rays

Frederick Douglass,
abolitionist, reformer, dies

Karl Marx – Das Kapital
posthumous publication

Art Nouveau style in vogue

Sigmund Freud:
Studien uber Hysterie

Louis Pasteur dies

In May of 1895 in a cramped house in Madanapalle, in the south of India, a child was born. The eighth child of an orthodox Telegu speaking Brahmin family, his mother Sanjeevama, and father Narayaniah named him Krishnamurti (the image or likeness of Krishna) after the Hindu god, Shri Krishna, who was considered the eighth incarnation of the god Vishnu.

Photo: Wisler & Klein, Madras
Adyar
C.W. Leadbeater
1896

Beginning of
Klondike Gold Rush

Richard Strauss composes
Thus Spake Zarathustra

Puccini: La Boheme

Modern Olympic Games
inaugurated by Coubertin in Paris

Gold discovered in South Africa

1897

Besant tours America, founds 23 new branches of Theosophical Society

War between
Greece and Ottoman Empire

George Melies opens studio for moving pictures

Bram Stoker writes Dracula

Germany occupies
Kiao-chow, China

Russia occupies Port Arthur

Italy defeated by Abyssinians

Dr. Annie Besant’s visit to Cardiff, Wales, 1924

CLICK TO EXPAND

Krishnamurti’s brother Nityananda was born. He was to become very close to him. That same year the frail and sickly Krishnamurti contracted malaria and barely survived.

Photo: Ruspoli, 1910
1898

J. Nityananda born, brother of Krishnamurti

Besant founds Central Hindu College

USA seizes Guam from Spain

Battleship Maine blown up
in Havana harbor

Spanish-American War begins

USA occupies Cuba

Emile Zola writes J’accuse in response to the Dreyfuss Case
Pierre and Marie Curie
discover radium

Lewis Carroll, author of
Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, dies

Photographs taken
using artificial light

1899

Philippines proclaim
independent government:
conflict with USA

Scott Joplin: “King of Ragtime”
writes Maple Leaf Rag

Leo Tolstoi writes
Resurrection

1st Peace Conference at
the Hague

Dr. Annie Besant
Early Theosophical gathering

Mr. Warrington, the acting President of the Theosophical Society, kindly invited me to come to Adyar and to give some talks here. I am very glad to have accepted his invitation and I appreciate his friendliness, which I hope will continue, even though we may differ completely in our ideas and opinions.

I hope that you will all listen to my talks without prejudice, and will not think that I am trying to attack your society. I want to do quite another thing. I want to arouse the desire for true search, and this, I think, is all that a teacher can do. That is all I want to do. If I can awaken that desire in you, I have completed my task, for out of that desire comes intelligence, that intelligence which is free from any system and organized belief. This intelligence is beyond all thought of compromise and false adjustment. So during these talks, those of you who belong to various societies or groups will please bear in mind that I am very grateful to the Theosophical Society and its acting President for having asked me to come here to speak, and that I am not attacking the Theosophical Society. I am not interested in attacking. But I hold that while organizations for the social welfare of man are necessary, societies based on religious hopes and beliefs are pernicious. So though I may appear to speak harshly, please bear in mind that I am not attacking any particular society, but that I am against all these false organizations which, though they profess to help man, are in reality a great hindrance and are the means of constant exploitation.

Krishnamurti – Public Talk 1, Adyar, 29 December 1933

The Challenge of Change film documents Krishnamurti’s life from the early theosophical days to his mid-80’s when he was still traveling, giving talks and holding dialogues.

“At the moment of light, thought withers away, and the conscious effort to experience and the remembrance of it, is the world that has been. And the word is never the actual.

At that moment -which is not of time- the ultimate is the immediate, but the ultimate has no symbol, it is of no person, of no god.”

Copyright © 2017 Krishnamurti Foundation of America