Discovered on the Beach

1905 - 1909
1905

Sanjeevama,
Krishnamurti’s mother, dies

Bloody Sunday Revolt
against Czar in St. Petersburg

Japan captures Port Arthur
and crushes Russian army
at Mukden

Paris: at Salon d’Automne
critic calls Matisse and others
“Les Fauves”

Sinn Fein begins in Dublin

Albert Einstein: Special Theory of Relativity

1906

C.W. Leadbeater resigns
from Theosophical Society

San Francisco earthquake
kills 700

Death of Paul Cezanne

Dreyfus Affair ends

All India Moslem League
established by Aga Khan

France and Spain control Morocco

Upton Sinclair exposes
stockyard conditions in Chicago

First helicopter flies

Theosophical Society Seal
1907

Besant made president
of Theosophical Society

Famine in Russia: 20 million die

Sigmund Freud meets Carl Jung

Picasso: “Les Demoiselles
d’Avignon”

First Cubist exhibit

The French occupy Morocco

Rasputin gains influence
over Tsar Nicolas II and family

New Zealand becomes Dominion

Baden-Powell founds the
Boy Scout movement

Chinese Democratic Republic
announced by Sun Yat-sen

1908

C.W. Leadbeater reinstated
in Theosophical Society

Frank Lloyd Wright designs
Robie House, Chicago

Fountain pen invented

Kenneth Graham:
The Wind in the Willows

Emmeline Pankhurst, suffragette, jailed

Vacuum cleaner patented

Marconi sends first radio message

Austria annexes Bosnia
and Herzegovina

Congo becomes Belgian Congo

Oil discovered in Persia

E. M. Forster: A Room with
a View

1909

Leadbeater sees
Krishnamurti on beach at Adyar

Besant meets Krishnamurti
for the first time

Collapse of Ottoman Empire

First Model T Ford sold

Diagilev’s Ballet Russe wows Paris

W.E.B. duBois
helps found NAACP

Women admitted to German
universities

London hairdresser introduces
“the permanent wave”

Martial Law in Spain

Revolution in Persia

U.S. intervenes in Nicaragua

Civil War in Honduras

Newsreel shown in theater

English Channel crossed

Gustav Mahler:
9th Symphony – begins
atonal music

Robert E. Peary reaches
the North Pole

Russell Balfour Clarke

Narayaniah, Krishnamurti’s father, had become a member of the Theosophical Society. He wrote to Annie Besant requesting permission to move his family to Adyar. In 1909 his request was granted.

Nitya, Hubert Van Hook and Krishnamurti

Strolling on the beach at Adyar, C.W. Leadbeater saw the young Krishnamurti. He immediately perceived an aura so radiant that he declared the fourteen year old was to be the vehicle for the World Teacher prophesied by Theosophists.

When Annie Besant returned to Adyar, she also intuited that the boy had rare spiritual qualities.

“Krishnamurti was born in 1895, the eighth child of a Brahmin family, the highest caste at a time when the system was rigidly observed. He was very close indeed to his mother who before he was born said she had a premonition that he would be in some way remarkable. She died when Krishnamurti was ten years old and the family moved to Adyar, near Madras. It was here living in extreme poverty that he was spotted by Charles Webster Leadbeater, a leading figure in the Theosophical Society. Theosophy was a world movement which embraced all religions. They believed that following on Buddha, Krishna and Christ the world was ready for the next incarnation of the Messiah. Its president, Annie Besant was a flamboyant figure who fought uncompromisingly for a whole range of social reforms in Britain and India.

Krishnamurti must have looked an unlikely candidate; undernourished, with crooked teeth and a vacant expression. But Leadbeater said the child had an aura of unselfishness; he was the chosen one. Mrs Besant adopted him and began grooming him for his future role by bringing him to England.”

Excerpt From The Role of a Flower documentary

C. W. Leadbeater, Krishnamurti, Annie Besant and Nityananda. Adyar 1911

Krishnamurti undergoes his first initiation, his brother Nitya was also accepted.

Photo: Ruspoli, 1910

“Mrs. Annie Besant became the President of the Theosophical Society and started looking very seriously, with her colleague C. W. Leadbeater, for a vehicle who they thought would be suitable for the World Teacher. The boy who was eventually chosen to be the Messiah was an Indian boy from South India called Jiddu Krishnamurti. He and his brother and other boys used to play on the beach every afternoon, because Adyar is on the sea.

And one day Leadbeater saw this boy on the beach and he was tremendously struck by his aura, which he said had not one trace of selfishness in it, and he immediately felt that this was the boy.”

Interview
Mary Lutyens
Krishnamurti’s biographer

“I arrived in Adyar in 1909, in August, and within a few days of my arrival I met C.W. Leadbeater. And almost immediately he introduced me to two Indian boys, J. Krishnamurti and his little brother Nityananda.

Krishnamurti was shy, reserved, mystically inclined, seemingly outwardly to be rather dull and not quick on the uptake, whereas his little brother sparkled with intelligence. They were in poor condition, very poor condition. And Leadbeater said, ‘We have a task and when Annie Besant arrives in India, she will help’.”

Interview
Russell Balfour Clarke
Krishnamurti’s first English tutor

Historical Film Rolls from 1920s | Part 1

“Meditation is the ending of thought, not by the meditator, for the meditator is the meditation. If there is no meditation, then you are like a blind man in a world of great beauty, light and colour. Wander by the seashore and let this meditative quality come upon you. If it does, don’t pursue it. What you pursue will be the memory of what it was – and what was is the death of what is. Or when you wander among the hills, let everything tell you the beauty and the pain of life, so that you awaken to your own sorrow and to the ending of it.”

1905

Sanjeevama,
Krishnamurti’s mother, dies

Bloody Sunday Revolt
against Czar in St. Petersburg

Japan captures Port Arthur
and crushes Russian army
at Mukden

Paris: at Salon d’Automne
critic calls Matisse and others
“Les Fauves”

Sinn Fein begins in Dublin

Albert Einstein: Special Theory of Relativity

Narayaniah, Krishnamurti’s father, had become a member of the Theosophical Society. He wrote to Annie Besant requesting permission to move his family to Adyar. In 1909 his request was granted.

Nitya, Hubert Van Hook and Krishnamurti

1906

C.W. Leadbeater resigns
from Theosophical Society

San Francisco earthquake
kills 700

Death of Paul Cezanne

Dreyfus Affair ends

All India Moslem League
established by Aga Khan

France and Spain control Morocco

Upton Sinclair exposes
stockyard conditions in Chicago

First helicopter flies

Theosophical Society Seal

Strolling on the beach at Adyar, C.W. Leadbeater saw the young Krishnamurti. He immediately perceived an aura so radiant that he declared the fourteen year old was to be the vehicle for the World Teacher prophesied by Theosophists.

When Annie Besant returned to Adyar, she also intuited that the boy had rare spiritual qualities.

1907

Besant made president
of Theosophical Society

Famine in Russia: 20 million die

Sigmund Freud meets Carl Jung

Picasso: “Les Demoiselles
d’Avignon”

First Cubist exhibit

The French occupy Morocco

Rasputin gains influence
over Tsar Nicolas II and family

New Zealand becomes Dominion

Baden-Powell founds the
Boy Scout movement

Chinese Democratic Republic
announced by Sun Yat-sen

“Krishnamurti was born in 1895, the eighth child of a Brahmin family, the highest caste at a time when the system was rigidly observed. He was very close indeed to his mother who before he was born said she had a premonition that he would be in some way remarkable. She died when Krishnamurti was ten years old and the family moved to Adyar, near Madras. It was here living in extreme poverty that he was spotted by Charles Webster Leadbeater, a leading figure in the Theosophical Society. Theosophy was a world movement which embraced all religions. They believed that following on Buddha, Krishna and Christ the world was ready for the next incarnation of the Messiah. Its president, Annie Besant was a flamboyant figure who fought uncompromisingly for a whole range of social reforms in Britain and India.

Krishnamurti must have looked an unlikely candidate; undernourished, with crooked teeth and a vacant expression. But Leadbeater said the child had an aura of unselfishness; he was the chosen one. Mrs Besant adopted him and began grooming him for his future role by bringing him to England.”

Excerpt From The Role of a Flower documentary

C. W. Leadbeater, Krishnamurti, Annie Besant and Nityananda. Adyar 1911

Krishnamurti undergoes his first initiation, his brother Nitya was also accepted.

Photo: Ruspoli, 1910
1908

C.W. Leadbeater reinstated
in Theosophical Society

Frank Lloyd Wright designs
Robie House, Chicago

Fountain pen invented

Kenneth Graham:
The Wind in the Willows

Emmeline Pankhurst, suffragette, jailed

Vacuum cleaner patented

Marconi sends first radio message

Austria annexes Bosnia
and Herzegovina

Congo becomes Belgian Congo

Oil discovered in Persia

E. M. Forster: A Room with
a View

“Mrs. Annie Besant became the President of the Theosophical Society and started looking very seriously, with her colleague C. W. Leadbeater, for a vehicle who they thought would be suitable for the World Teacher. The boy who was eventually chosen to be the Messiah was an Indian boy from South India called Jiddu Krishnamurti. He and his brother and other boys used to play on the beach every afternoon, because Adyar is on the sea.

And one day Leadbeater saw this boy on the beach and he was tremendously struck by his aura, which he said had not one trace of selfishness in it, and he immediately felt that this was the boy.”

Interview
Mary Lutyens
Krishnamurti’s biographer

“I arrived in Adyar in 1909, in August, and within a few days of my arrival I met C.W. Leadbeater. And almost immediately he introduced me to two Indian boys, J. Krishnamurti and his little brother Nityananda.

Krishnamurti was shy, reserved, mystically inclined, seemingly outwardly to be rather dull and not quick on the uptake, whereas his little brother sparkled with intelligence. They were in poor condition, very poor condition. And Leadbeater said, ‘We have a task and when Annie Besant arrives in India, she will help’.”

Interview
Russell Balfour Clarke
Krishnamurti’s first English tutor

1909

Leadbeater sees
Krishnamurti on beach at Adyar

Besant meets Krishnamurti
for the first time

Collapse of Ottoman Empire

First Model T Ford sold

Diagilev’s Ballet Russe wows Paris

W.E.B. duBois
helps found NAACP

Women admitted to German
universities

London hairdresser introduces
“the permanent wave”

Martial Law in Spain

Revolution in Persia

U.S. intervenes in Nicaragua

Civil War in Honduras

Newsreel shown in theater

English Channel crossed

Gustav Mahler:
9th Symphony – begins
atonal music

Robert E. Peary reaches
the North Pole

Russell Balfour Clarke

Historical Film Rolls from 1920s | Part 1

“Meditation is the ending of thought, not by the meditator, for the meditator is the meditation. If there is no meditation, then you are like a blind man in a world of great beauty, light and colour. Wander by the seashore and let this meditative quality come upon you. If it does, don’t pursue it. What you pursue will be the memory of what it was – and what was is the death of what is. Or when you wander among the hills, let everything tell you the beauty and the pain of life, so that you awaken to your own sorrow and to the ending of it.”

Copyright © 2017 Krishnamurti Foundation of America

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